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The areas of Suffolk without a single coronavirus death

PUBLISHED: 11:05 27 July 2020 | UPDATED: 11:13 27 July 2020

Four areas of Suffolk have not recorded a single coronavirus death (stock image) Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

Four areas of Suffolk have not recorded a single coronavirus death (stock image) Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

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Four neighbourhoods in Suffolk have not reported a single coronavirus-related death, according to the latest data.

The Office for National Statistics has released a map dividing the country into small neighbourhoods of around 7,000 people, called MSOAs.

There are 90 MSOAs in Suffolk and all of them have reported at least one coronavirus-related death throughout the pandemic, apart from four.

Three are in west Suffolk - Lakenheath, Beck Row, Eriswell & Barton Mills and Howard Estate & Northgate in Bury St Edmunds.

The fourth area to record no deaths covers the east Suffolk communities of Yoxford, Wenhaston and Walberswick.

It is now mandatory to wear a face mask in shops and supermarkets in England Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWNIt is now mandatory to wear a face mask in shops and supermarkets in England Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

• You can explore the map above to see the figures for where you live.

By measuring the number of Covid-19 related deaths as a percentage of all fatalities in that neighbourhood, the data also shows which areas had the highest percentage of coronavirus deaths.

In Suffolk, the neighbourhood recording the highest percentage of 48% was Westgate in Ipswich, where 15 out of 31 total deaths were coronavirus related.

Castle Hill, also in Ipswich, had the second highest percentage of 44%, with 15 out of 34 deaths attributed to Covid-19.

The latter recorded one coronavirus death in June while Westgate has not recorded a fatality from Covid-19 since May.

The latest infection rate for Suffolk has fallen below pre-lockdown levels, public health data shows.

MORE: Revealed – Suffolk had 1,000 more coronavirus cases than reported at height of pandemic

Every neighbourhood in the north Essex districts of Colchester and Tendring has recorded at least one coronavirus-related death.

In Tendring, Clacton West has recorded the smallest percentage of coronavirus deaths (7%) with four out of 54 total fatalities attributed to Covid-19.

Essex County Council have confirmed the first signs of a regional outbreak of Covid-19 in the Harwich and Clacton area. Picture: NIGE BROWNEssex County Council have confirmed the first signs of a regional outbreak of Covid-19 in the Harwich and Clacton area. Picture: NIGE BROWN

The highest percentages have been logged in Clacton North, where 12 out of a total 38 deaths have been linked to the virus.

Meanwhile Central Colchester and Abbey Field have recorded the lowest percentages in the Colchester district, compared with the Horkesley Heath, Langham and Dedham neighbourhood where 16 out of 40 deaths have been attributed to Covid-19.

On Friday, Essex County Council’s public health director Dr Mike Gogarty confirmed experts had witnessed the first signs of an increase in Covid-19 cases in Clacton and Harwich.

He said the authority is taking necessary action to put measures in place to protect residents.

MORE: Concern over ‘first signs’ of virus spike in Essex

Nationally, the ONS said the figures showed the South West had the lowest proportion of Covid-19 deaths, while the North West had the highest.

Sarah Caul, from the ONS, said: “Following the peak recorded in April, in June we have seen a large decrease in the proportion of deaths involving Covid-19 across all English regions and Wales.

“London experienced the largest decrease over the period from having more than one in 2 deaths in April which involved Covid-19 to only about one in 20 deaths in June that were related to the coronavirus.”

Despite the low numbers, public health officials in Suffolk and Essex have repeatedly warned people to remain vigilant.


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