Revealed: The most isolated villages in Suffolk

The Swan in Worlingworth, one of the most isolated communities in Suffolk

The Swan in Worlingworth, one of the most isolated communities in Suffolk - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Latest government figures have revealed the most isolated communities in Suffolk – with one village named one of the most remote in the UK.

The Department for Transport statistics reflect how long it takes for people to reach key services such as schools, GPs, hospitals and food stores across a range of different transport methods.

The data was collected in 2019 and takes into account more than 32,000 neighbourhoods in the country.

Here are seven of the most isolated places to live in Suffolk.

Kelsale and Yoxford, East Suffolk

Twilight descends upon the fields near Yoxford.

Twilight descends upon the fields near Yoxford. - Credit: Archant

Kelsale and Yoxford is the most isolated place to live in Suffolk and the ninth in the entire UK.

To reach key services by public transport or by walking, it takes an average of 87 minutes to complete the journey, according to the data.

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Deben, East Suffolk

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The River Deben is an icon in Suffolk - Credit: CHARLOTTE BOND

It takes about 79 minutes to reach key services by public transport for those living in the Deben area and even if you opt to travel by car, you're facing a 22-minute journey.

Another neighbourhood in the Suffolk Coastal area, Deben's charm comes at the cost of reduced connectivity.

Rendlesham and Orford, East Suffolk

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Orford Ness is an area of outstanding natural beauty in Suffolk - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Home to the sprawling Orford Ness nature reserve, this part of Suffolk is understandably isolated – but is also surrounded by immense natural beauty.

This neighbourhood was the most isolated in Suffolk when it came to cycling and travelling by car, with journeys taking 51 minutes and 24 minutes respectively.

Rattlesden, Mid Suffolk

Suffolk Magazine village feature in Rattlesden.

Rattlesden is one of the most isolated neighbourhoods in Suffolk - Credit: Phil Morley

Despite being in the heart of Suffolk, Rattlesden remains a relatively isolated community.

For those who want to reach key services using public transport or on foot, it will take an estimated 75 minutes to arrive at the desired destination.

North West Cosford, Babergh

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The River Box flows through Cosford - Credit: citizenside.com

North West Cosford is another area which struggles with public transport links, with it taking 72 minutes on average to complete a journey – making it not very accessible.

However, those who want to travel by car or bicycle should have no issue reaching their destination.

Assington, Babergh

Samantha Gay (Suffolk Wildlife Trust) is pictured with the bluebells in flower at Arger Fen, Assingt

Samantha Gay (Suffolk Wildlife Trust) is pictured with the bluebells in flower at Arger Fen, Assington. - Credit: Archant

Assington is the most isolated place in Suffolk when it comes to walking.

Situated in the Babergh district, it takes more than 100 minutes to walk to key services, according to the data.

Hoxne and Worlingworth, Mid Suffolk

Hoxne and Worlingworth is particularly remote when it comes to car travel.

Those living in the area face journeys of more than 20 minutes if they require key services.

Despite the relatively high travel times for certain neighbourhoods in Suffolk, this can often add to the appeal for potential house-buyers – with the relaxing atmosphere in the rural parts of the county gaining increasing popularity.

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Peter Ogilvie, head of residential sales at Savills Suffolk - Credit: Richard Marsham

Peter Ogilvie, head of residential sales at Savills in Suffolk, said: “The experiences of the last two years or so have encouraged many people to search further afield and there has been a well-documented ‘race for space’ – with certain buyers looking for somewhere in a quieter, more rural location.

"This to some extent is still continuing – part of Suffolk’s charm is that you can escape off the beaten track.

"But more recently we have seen an increase in buyers looking for homes in well-connected towns and villages, with good transport links, within easy reach of schools, in close proximity to a range of amenities and near to shops, restaurants and pubs.

"Larger, family homes in the most popular areas are in short supply and competition among buyers is strong, which in some cases has led to an uptick in prices.”