7 ways life in Suffolk could be affected in heatwave next week

Temperatures in Suffolk are expected to soar on Monday and Tuesday

Temperatures in Suffolk are expected to soar on Monday and Tuesday - Credit: Charlotte Bond

Suffolk is braced for scorching temperatures of up to 40C next week after the first-ever red weather warning for heat was issued by the Met Office.

The warning is in place for Haverhill, Mildenhall, Newmarket and Clare over Monday and Tuesday, with the rest of the county in a lesser amber warning.

According to the Met Office there could be population-wide adverse health effects, not limited to those most vulnerable, due to the extreme heat.

The warning has been made in parallel with the UK Health Security Agency upgrading its previously-issued heat-health alert to the most serious level four.

This is how the heatwave could affect everyday life in Suffolk.

Temperatures

The mercury could reach the mid-30s on Monday, with the hottest temperatures likely to be in the western parts of Suffolk.

Tuesday, although it may be cloudier, is expected to be the hottest of the two days – with temperatures of 40C possible.

Abigail, Gabi and Archie Chapman enjoying an ice cream at Felixstowe beach

Abigail, Gabi and Archie Chapman enjoying an ice cream at Felixstowe beach - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Forecasters have said there is a 60% chance of the UK's hottest-ever temperature of 38.7C being broken on Tuesday.

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Zoe Johnson, meteorologist with East Anglian-based forecasters Weatherquest, said: "Monday and Tuesday are looking like they will be the peak of the heat. There's some very hot air coming to us.

"On Monday it will be widely in the mid-30s, potentially 37C or 38C in the western part of the region.

"However on Tuesday, although it looks like it will be the hottest of the days, will likely be cloudy. But we could see temperatures of up to 40C."

Traffic and travel

The Met Office's red weather warning says delays and even road closures are possible in the areas where the heat will be most extreme.

The AA has warned the inside of cars could feel like 60C in the heat, making them feel like a "mobile microwave".

A first-ever red weather warning has been issued in Suffolk for Monday and Tuesday

A first-ever red weather warning has been issued in Suffolk for Monday and Tuesday - Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Greater Anglia has also said rail services could be impacted, urging people to only travel if necessary on Monday and Tuesday, while trains will run at reduced speeds.

Passengers are warned to expect widespread disruption and short-notice cancellations, especially from the middle of the day onwards when the hottest temperatures arrive.

A reduced service will operate on the Norwich to London Liverpool Street line, which stops at Ipswich.

Greater Anglia managing director Jamie Burles said: "We are very sorry to be disrupting our customers’ travel plans, but the safety of our customers and rail staff is of paramount importance."

Bin collections

Babergh and Mid Suffolk councils have confirmed bin collections on Monday and Tuesday will be earlier than usual to allow for staff to complete their work before the heat picks up.

Ipswich Borough Council has said collections will start at 5am on Tuesday.

Bin collections in Suffolk could be affected by the heatwave

Bin collections in Suffolk could be affected by the heatwave - Credit: Archant

East Suffolk Council has said no major alterations to bin collections are planned, while West Suffolk Council has also not announced any changes.

Schools

No school closures have been announced in Suffolk so far, and there is no rule that states that they must close in extreme weather.

Schools are treated the same as workplaces where there is no maximum temperature threshold at which they must shut.

However, the government’s Health and Safety Executive states that temperatures in places of work must be "reasonable".

Health

NHS leaders have said services across Suffolk are "very busy" and are calling on support from the public to use services wisely.

They say this will ensure emergency care is available for those who need it most.

Dr Richard West, of Woolpit Health Centre, said: "While many of us enjoy the hot weather, when it is for longer periods the risk to wider public health can be significant.

Dr Richard West is pictured at Woolpit Health Centre. New year's Honours

Dr Richard West, of Woolpit Health Centre - Credit: Phil Morley

"This is particularly the case for very young children, older people or those with a long-term health condition or illness.

"We would also urge those who know of vulnerable relatives or friends to look out for them during this time."

Pets

Animals are also at risk in extreme temperatures, with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs advising dog owners to walk their pets in the morning or evening when it is cooler, and to ensure they have enough shade and water.

Owners are also warned to never leave pets alone in parked cars, and make sure they are aware of the key signs of heatstroke – symptoms in dogs and cats can include panting, diarrhoea and restlessness.

Risk of fire

Jon Lacey, chief fire officer for Suffolk Fire and Rescue Service, has encouraged people to enjoy the weather "safely" and to minimise the "increased fire risk" posed by scorching temperatures.

Jon Lacey

Jon Lacey, chief fire officer for Suffolk Fire and Rescue Service - Credit: Suffolk County Council

People are being urged not to start fires in fields or forests, move barbecues away from anything flammable and be aware when wearing loose, flowing clothes near open flames.