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WATCH: ‘Things will be different’: Video shows how schools have changed after coronavirus

PUBLISHED: 15:34 31 May 2020 | UPDATED: 15:34 31 May 2020

Woodhall Primary School, in Sudbury, has made a number of changes to its classrooms and playgrounds following the coronavirus crisis. Picture: UNITY SCHOOLS PARTNERSHIP

Woodhall Primary School, in Sudbury, has made a number of changes to its classrooms and playgrounds following the coronavirus crisis. Picture: UNITY SCHOOLS PARTNERSHIP

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A Sudbury primary has offered a glimpse into what life will be like when schools reopen to more pupils on Monday - with a video showing how things will be different after Covid-19.

Woodhall Primary School, in Sudbury, has made a number of changes to its classrooms and playgrounds following the coronavirus crisis. Picture: UNITY SCHOOLS PARTNERSHIPWoodhall Primary School, in Sudbury, has made a number of changes to its classrooms and playgrounds following the coronavirus crisis. Picture: UNITY SCHOOLS PARTNERSHIP

The Woodhall Primary School video shows markings made in the playground telling reception, year-one and year-six children where to stand, so they keep two-metres apart in line with government social distancing rules.

There will also be separate entrances and exits for different year groups, staggered playtimes, smaller class sizes and a one-way system around the playground.

Deputy headteacher Helen Arbon tells pupils in the video: “Things will be different.

“You’ll be learning in smaller groups, called ‘bubbles’. You will be in smaller groups at playtime.

Woodhall Primary School, in Sudbury, has made a number of changes to its classrooms and playgrounds following the coronavirus crisis. Picture: UNITY SCHOOLS PARTNERSHIPWoodhall Primary School, in Sudbury, has made a number of changes to its classrooms and playgrounds following the coronavirus crisis. Picture: UNITY SCHOOLS PARTNERSHIP

“There will be different entrances for you to come into the school and you’ll be arriving at different times.”

Only a handful of Suffolk primary schools are not reopening after the government gave the green light to a phased restarting of lessons from June 1.

Each school has made arrangements for social distancing and pupil and staff safety as much as possible. Education chiefs at Suffolk County Council said staff had worked “round the clock to make it happen”.

Increased cleaning regimes will also be implemented at schools to keep surfaces safe, while parents have been warned not to gather at school gates as they might normally do.

Woodhall Primary School, in Sudbury, has made a number of changes to its classrooms and playgrounds following the coronavirus crisis. Picture: UNITY SCHOOLS PARTNERSHIPWoodhall Primary School, in Sudbury, has made a number of changes to its classrooms and playgrounds following the coronavirus crisis. Picture: UNITY SCHOOLS PARTNERSHIP

At Woodhall, teachers are also asking young people to come to school in clean uniform every day - and, on days when they have PE, they will wear their sports kits all day to save getting changed.

Ms Arbon added that “your classroom will look a little bit different”, with chairs and tables more spaced out to ensure social distancing.

Lunch will also be eaten outside wherever possible.

Ms Arbon added: “We wanted to use the video to reassure parents that we have taken sensible precautions ahead of the partial reopening.”

Woodhall Primary School, in Sudbury, has made a number of changes to its classrooms and playgrounds following the coronavirus crisis. Picture: UNITY SCHOOLS PARTNERSHIPWoodhall Primary School, in Sudbury, has made a number of changes to its classrooms and playgrounds following the coronavirus crisis. Picture: UNITY SCHOOLS PARTNERSHIP

Tim Coulson - chief executive of Unity Schools Partnership, which runs the school - said: “The video from Woodhall is a great way to reassure parents and highlight all the work school staff have done to get everything ready.

“We have 16 primary schools within our trust and they have all been working closely together to adopt a largely consistent set of plans, while tailoring them in the best way to support students and staff within their own environments.

“Our staff have worked incredibly hard in a short space of time to ensure our schools are ready.

“We have been hugely impressed with the resilience and adaptability of all our students since lockdown begun. They have approached home learning with typical endeavour and commitment and we would like to thank them and their families for all their hard work and support.

“Alongside that, our staff have worked incredibly hard in a short space of time to ensure our schools are ready – they have all been a credit to their profession.”


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